Expert's View

  • Taking a closer look at the biggest factors...

    As we move past the vertex of a U-shaped dip in the global shipping sector caused by supply chain restrictions arising from the COVID-19 pandemic,  it is worthwhile to look back at the UAE maritime industry’s growth, lessons learned, and development outlook. Although international maritime trade dropped by 4.1 per cent in 2020, the UAE made significant achievements during this period, ranking third globally in the Bunker Supply Index, and fifth globally as a key competitive maritime hub.

     

  • Charterers drive LNG’s own transition journey

    Some of the world’s largest gas producers are behind moves to cut greenhouse gas emissions along every link in the LNG supply chain – from well to consumer. They are also supporting initiatives that could see every LNG cargo consignment assigned not only a calorific content but also a label, detailing its emissions footprint.

     

  • Supporting the Blue Economy with maritime security

    Maritime security is essential to support the Blue Economy in various ways. It refers to protection from threats such as maritime inter-state disputes, terrorism, crimes, narco-trafficking, illegal fishing, arms trafficking, crimes related to the marine environment, and maritime piracy,  which is one of the most significant threats to the growth of ocean-based economies.

     

  • Race to zero carbon emissions: Why hybrid...

    Over the years, sustainability has pushed many players and stakeholders in the maritime industry to explore ways to reduce their carbon footprint without sacrificing comfort and functionality. The rising rollout of hybrid propulsion systems in marine vessels is one of the ways that the sector has responded to calls for stricter carbon emission monitoring within the community.  

     

  • Sustainable propulsion systems: Building the...

    The steady rise of eco-friendly superyachts anywhere in the world points to how sustainability has found its way in the global yachting community. Given the mounting sustainability movement, the future of the industry now lies in its ability to reduce its environmental impact. Overall, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) targets to decrease the carbon footprint of international shipping by at least 40 per cent by 2030 compared to 2008 levels, and by 70 per cent by 2050. The yachting sector has a role to play in meeting and complying with the IMO targets put in place to protect our oceans and marine life.

     

  • Continuing evolution: The LNG carrier of 2030

    While LNG carriers have a relatively short history, they have been subject to a continuous evolution in their design and operational parameters over the last decade. Many of the design changes reflect the natural maturity of the industry, others have come in response to technical, operational and regulatory changes. So will the LNG ship of 2030 still have the design speed we see today? For an answer, it is necessary to look first at what we can expect from the key areas of the LNG vessel design and operation.

     

  • Decarbonising shipping: Could ammonia be the fuel...

    Today 80 per cent of ammonia produced is used exclusively for the fertiliser industry. However, as pressure is placed on the shipping sector to decarbonise and shift away from reliance on fossil fuels, ammonia is looking like an attractive alternative. If 30 per cent of shipping switched to ammonia as a fuel, then the current production would have to nearly double.

     

  • ABS responds to COVID-19 with enhanced remote...

    Classification society now leads the industry with the scope of remote survey services available and is providing practical support too, Chris Greenwood, ABS Director of Regional Business Development - Middle East and Africa speaks only to Marasi News on how ABS has responded to challenges faced by the marine and offshore industries during the COVID-19 pandemic besides the post-covid-19 industry outlook.

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Taking a closer look at the biggest factors driving the progress of the UAE’s maritime sector

As we move past the vertex of a U-shaped dip in the global shipping sector caused by supply chain restrictions arising from the COVID-19 pandemic,  it is worthwhile to look back at the UAE maritime industry’s growth, lessons learned, and development outlook. Although international maritime trade dropped by 4.1 per cent in 2020, the UAE made significant achievements during this period, ranking third globally in the Bunker Supply Index, and fifth globally as a key competitive maritime hub.

 

English

Charterers drive LNG’s own transition journey

Some of the world’s largest gas producers are behind moves to cut greenhouse gas emissions along every link in the LNG supply chain – from well to consumer. They are also supporting initiatives that could see every LNG cargo consignment assigned not only a calorific content but also a label, detailing its emissions footprint.

 
English

Race to zero carbon emissions: Why hybrid propulsion systems in marine vessels matter?

Over the years, sustainability has pushed many players and stakeholders in the maritime industry to explore ways to reduce their carbon footprint without sacrificing comfort and functionality. The rising rollout of hybrid propulsion systems in marine vessels is one of the ways that the sector has responded to calls for stricter carbon emission monitoring within the community.  

 
English

Supporting the Blue Economy with maritime security

Maritime security is essential to support the Blue Economy in various ways. It refers to protection from threats such as maritime inter-state disputes, terrorism, crimes, narco-trafficking, illegal fishing, arms trafficking, crimes related to the marine environment, and maritime piracy,  which is one of the most significant threats to the growth of ocean-based economies.

 
English

Sustainable propulsion systems: Building the yachting industry of the future

The steady rise of eco-friendly superyachts anywhere in the world points to how sustainability has found its way in the global yachting community. Given the mounting sustainability movement, the future of the industry now lies in its ability to reduce its environmental impact. Overall, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) targets to decrease the carbon footprint of international shipping by at least 40 per cent by 2030 compared to 2008 levels, and by 70 per cent by 2050. The yachting sector has a role to play in meeting and complying with the IMO targets put in place to protect our oceans and marine life.

 
English

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